(780) 448-1281 info@pandocareco.com

How we can help you

Our promise to you

  • Certified prosthetists with substantial experience and expertise
  • Professional and confidential service
  • Active listening skills and a commitment to treat all clients with respect
  • Focus on excellent outcomes and follow-up

The services we offer

Prosthetics

Upper extremity amputee
Upper Extremity
Lower extremity amputee
Lower Extremity

Our services are extensive, from taking on difficult-to-fit cases to creating custom art sockets. Whether it is new technology or tried-and-true components, we have the competency and training to provide the most appropriate solution to meet your needs.

Orthotics

  • Foot orthotics/Insoles
  • On-site fabrication and adjustment

We supply a full range of customized foot orthotics, from soft arch supports to rigid structural control.

What are your needs?

Choose a heading below to find more helpful information, whether you are a new amputee, existing prosthetic wearer, or thinking about changing your prosthetist.

What are prosthetics?

Prosthetics work to restore function for what is missing from your body.

An amputation is not a medical failure — it can save lives and ease chronic pain. It’s also a chance for the surgeon to make you the most appropriate residual limb to use with your prosthetic. We offer pre-surgical consultation should you wish to explore this further.

Amputations can result from diabetes, bacterial infection, cancer, circulatory disease, and trauma. As well, some people may be born with underdeveloped limbs that can be made useful by reconstructive surgery.

Dealing with the psychological effects of losing a limb

First, you should know that each individual will handle the loss of a limb in a very personal way. You may go through none, some, or all of the various stages of grief, and not necessarily in any particular order.

Use whatever support network is available to you. Involve your loved ones, and also your physician, prosthetist, psychiatrist or psychologist, and your friends. What matters is that eventually you are able to put the loss behind you and focus on your rehabilitation.

Scientific evidence has shown that the most successful outcomes are the result of early intervention following amputation. See a prosthetist if possible even before your amputation, but certainly within weeks following your surgery. If you would like, we are available to meet with you in the hospital.

Realize that the pathway to your goals may change. Start where you are, and together, we will work to restore function so that you can take the steps necessary to achieve your goals to the best of your ability.

When to involve a prosthetist in your care

An effective multi-disciplinary rehabilitation team will include you (the client/amputee) and your physician, physiatrist, prosthetist, and physiotherapist. It may also include a wound-care or home care nurse and an occupational therapist.

We recommend that you see a prosthetist if possible even before your amputation, but certainly within weeks following your amputation. The earlier you begin rehabilitation, the more likely you are to succeed. Learn what a prosthetic fitting might mean for you. Become informed.

Your prosthetist will look at the physical aspects of your limb, discuss with you your lifestyle and goals, and suggest possible fitting techniques that can help you achieve the best functional outcome.

How do I find a prosthetist?

Ask your orthopedic surgeon or a member of your rehabilitation team for a complete list of all of the prosthetists in the Edmonton area. You can also locate a certified prosthetist using one of the following:

As a consumer, you have a choice of dentist, eye doctor, physician — and prosthetist. If you are faced with an amputation, you can choose who will make your first artificial limb.

What should I look for in a prosthetist?

A relationship based on trust

You and your prosthetist will likely have a relationship for the rest of your life. Your prosthetist can help you understand how to care for your skin, use and maintain your prosthesis, and watch for any danger signs.

Your prosthetist should listen to you, treat you with respect, and be committed to serving your needs. Search for someone who is honest, communicative, empathetic, and knowledgeable.

Your prosthetist should be willing to spend considerable time with you, and you with your prosthetist. You need to be able to communicate well with each other. Ensure that the person has a character that is compatible with your own. As the consumer, you control your quality of life.

Your prosthetist’s education and experience

A certified prosthetist is specifically educated and clinically trained to manage the provision of your comprehensive prosthetic care. All prosthetists who work in the province must be certified by the Canadian Board for Certification of Prosthetists and Orthotists. Find out about the prosthetist’s credentials and level of education and experience.

Prostheses are custom-made to each person according to his or her own limb size and shape as well as their individual abilities and lifestyle requirements. There is no “one size fits all” type of prosthesis. Ask the prosthetist to describe his or her fitting protocol and the technology he or she uses.

The facility

You will be spending considerable time at the facility for prosthetic fitting. A clean, accessible facility, with ample parking and a friendly, helpful staff is a must. You should feel comfortable and cared for. You should not be kept waiting weeks either to be seen by a prosthetist or for your device.

Our Facility

The prosthetic process

After your surgery

Right after surgery, you will be fitted with a shrinker sock to control edema (swelling) in your residual limb.

When your surgeon discharges you from hospital, you’ll either be sent home to convalesce or to a rehabilitation hospital.

Depending on your circumstances, recovering at home can be a good option. At home — encouraged and surrounded by loved ones, and with the help of a wound-care nurse — you can access out-patient services, with careful monitoring to ensure that the wound is clean and compression is properly applied.

Regardless of where you convalesce, when your caregiver team decides that your limb is ready for prosthetic fitting, you are free to choose where your prosthesis will be made.

Your first fitting

If you are receiving wound care in your home and have the support of your family, a certified prosthetist can make your initial prosthesis.

After receiving a prescription (valid for three months) from your orthopedic or vascular surgeon or a physiatrist, your prosthetist will begin the fitting protocol by applying a liner that:

  • Protects your limb from infection.
  • Limits the amount of swelling.
  • Begins to shape the residuum (remaining limb).
  • Conditions your skin.
  • Provides a healthy environment for healing to occur.

Once your sutures are removed and you can tolerate a little pressure on the residuum, the actual fitting can begin.

Your initial prosthetic fitting

On your initial visit for a prosthetic fitting, your prosthetist will conduct an evaluation to assess your overall health, strength, mobility, and basic cognitive skills. You will discuss your present lifestyle and work situation as well as your expectations for your future. Your prosthetist will also evaluate the condition of your skin and examine the shape of the remaining limb (the residuum).

He or she then measures your limb and makes a hand-crafted plaster mold or impression. At P&O Care Co., our clinical experience indicates that hand-crafting will result in the most accurate and comfortable socket, which is key to a properly fit prosthesis.

From this mold, your prosthetist generates a temporary (or check) socket, encasing and protecting your residuum. The rest of the prosthetic components will be attached first to this temporary socket.

Once fit and alignment are established, you will receive gait-training to teach you how to use your prosthesis. You will begin to feather your weight onto the prosthesis using a walking aid initially and gradually transferring your weight to the prosthetic side as in normal walking gait.

Most people will leave the facility with a working temporary prosthesis after just a few visits.

For your initial fitting, you may need several revised or new temporary check sockets to monitor whether total surface contact is being achieved and to follow any shape and volume changes in the residuum.

When wearing a prosthesis, you should not experience blistering, abrasion, excessive soreness, irritation, or undue discomfort. Return to your prosthetist right away if you experience any of these symptoms. Your prosthetic fitting should be a positive experience – physically, mentally, and emotionally.

Once your temporary socket is fitting well, your definitive socket will be made. Also at this time, a cosmetic finishing can be applied. Your prosthetist will be happy to discuss the various cosmetic coverings and types of finishing we can provide.

Taking care of your prosthesis

Many factors influence how long a prosthesis lasts.

Limb change is most notable during the first two years following amputation and should be followed closely. Modifications can be made to the socket; however, you may require a replacement socket during that time. Once the limb has matured into its preferred shape and size, your definitive prosthesis may last for years with regular maintenance.

You’ll need to replace components occasionally if they are worn or need upgrading. Also, weight gain or loss, a change in medical condition, or additional surgery may mean that you require a new socket.

Return to your prosthetist immediately if you notice any noise, instability, or if you are experiencing discomfort. It is a good idea to return to your prosthetist at least every six months for assessment to ensure the prosthesis is fitting well and functioning properly.

How do I pay for my prosthesis?

All prosthetists in the province of Alberta must abide by the same fee schedules. You will not be charged differently whether the provider is in a public or in a free-standing facility. We have provided below a list of potential paying agents.

A new amputee requires a prescription — the first time from an orthopedic or vascular surgeon or physiatrist and after that from a medical doctor or nurse practitioner.

You will also be asked for the following:

  • Your Alberta Health Care or other provincial health care identification number.
  • Your private insurance identification number, insurer’s name and address, and (once work has been provided and the provider is ready to make a claim) a signed insurance claim form(s).
  • Specific paying agent information.

Potential paying agents include:

How we can help you with insurance

Your prosthetic services are provided and billed by P&O Care Co. We have over 20 years’ experience in helping our clients through the insurance process. We sit down with every client to ensure that they receive the full amount of financial support available.

We are authorizers, specialty assessors/suppliers, vendors and/or providers, as the term may apply, under AADL, Workers’ Compensation Board of Alberta and its various counterparts throughout Canada, Veterans Affairs (RCMP, military personnel, veterans), the NIHB Program (Inuit and First Nations), and the Interim Federal Health Program (for refugees).

As well, we serve amputees from outside the province where practicable. If you have private insurance, we will work with the company to determine your coverage.

As a third-party, however, we may be unable to file a claim on your behalf. In that case, we can provide you with proof of payment that you can submit for direct reimbursement. Please note that with any plan there may be deductible and cost-share amounts for which you could be responsible.

We’re happy to help you with insurance forms or answer any questions you may have concerning our services.

Find out more

  • Amputee Resources for Canadian Amputees
    Amputee and disability resources, including amputee phantom pain support group, humour, stories, news, and more for the active or new amputee.
  • War Amps of Canada
    The organization seeks to improve the quality of life for all amputees, especially children, and is a wealth of information and support.
  • Orthotics Prosthetics Canada/CBCPO
    The association encourages and promotes high standards of professionalism and patient-care services in the prosthetic and orthotic profession. The CBCPO is the regulatory body for the prosthetic and orthotic profession within Canada. As well, the organization provides information on new initiatives, professional issues, and certification news for the prosthetics and orthotics industry and the general public. Locate a certified practitioner in your area using this website.
  • AASRA (Alberta Amputee Sports and Recreation Association)
    The association supports and empowers Alberta amputees through sport and recreation.
  • Amputation Help and Resource Guide
    This website includes very good information about products you may need for your daily living. It is separated into several categories of interest.

How do I find another prosthetist?

Ask your orthopedic surgeon or a member of your rehabilitation team for a complete list of all of the prosthetists in the Edmonton area. You can also locate a certified prosthetist using one of the following:

As a consumer, you have a choice of dentist, eye doctor, physician — and prosthetist. And as an amputee, you can choose who will make your artificial limbs.

What should you look for in your prosthetist?

A relationship based on trust

You will likely need to see a prosthetist for the rest of your life. Therefore, search for someone who is honest, communicative, empathetic, and knowledgeable. Your prosthetist should listen to you, treat you with respect, and be committed to serving your needs.

Your prosthetist should be willing to spend considerable time with you, and you with your prosthetist. You need to be able to communicate well with each other. Ensure that the person has a character that is compatible with your own. As the consumer, you control your quality of life.

Your prosthetist’s education and experience

A certified prosthetist is specifically educated and clinically trained to manage the provision of your comprehensive prosthetic care. All prosthetists who work in the province must be certified by the Canadian Board for Certification of Prosthetists and Orthotists. Find out about the prosthetist’s credentials and level of education and experience.

Prostheses are custom-made to each person according to his or her own limb size and shape as well as their individual abilities and lifestyle requirements. There is no “one size fits all” type of prosthesis. Ask the prosthetist to describe his or her fitting protocol and the technology he or she uses.

The facility

You will be spending considerable time at the facility for prosthetic fitting. A clean, accessible facility, with ample parking and a friendly, helpful staff is a must. You should feel comfortable and cared for. You should not be kept waiting weeks either to be seen by a prosthetist or for your device.

Our Facility

Taking care of your prosthesis

Many factors influence how long a prosthesis lasts.

Limb change is most notable during the first two years following amputation and should be followed closely. Modifications can be made to the socket; however, you may require a replacement socket during that time. Once the limb has matured into its preferred shape and size, your definitive prosthesis may last for years with regular maintenance.

You’ll need to replace components occasionally if they are worn or need upgrading. Also, weight gain or loss, a change in medical condition, or additional surgery may mean that you require a new socket.

Return to your prosthetist immediately if you notice any noise, instability, or if you are experiencing discomfort. It is a good idea to return to your prosthetist at least every six months for assessment to ensure the prosthesis is fitting well and functioning properly.

How do I pay for my prosthesis?

All prosthetists in the province of Alberta must abide by the same fee schedules. You will not be charged differently whether the provider is in a public or in a free-standing facility. We have provided below a list of potential paying agents.

Most payors who fund devices will demand a prescription (valid for three months) when a new socket or major component is required.  A medical doctor, nurse practitioner, or a physiatrist can supply this. If you have had a revision surgery, the prescription could be provided also by an orthopedic or vascular surgeon.

You will be asked for the following:

  • Your Alberta Health Care or other provincial health care identification number.
  • Your private insurance identification number, insurer’s name and address, and (once work has been provided and the provider is ready to make a claim) a signed insurance claim form(s).
  • Specific paying agent information.

Potential paying agents include:

How we can help you with insurance

Your prosthetic services are provided and billed by P&O Care Co. We have over 20 years’ experience in helping our clients through the insurance process. We sit down with every client to ensure that they receive the full amount of financial support available.

We are authorizers, specialty assessors/suppliers, vendors and/or providers, as the term may apply, under AADL, Workers’ Compensation Board of Alberta and its various counterparts throughout Canada, Veterans Affairs (RCMP, military personnel, veterans), the NIHB Program (Inuit and First Nations), and the Interim Federal Health Program (for refugees).

As well, we serve amputees from outside the province where practicable. If you have private insurance, we will work with the company to determine your coverage.

As a third-party, however, we may be unable to file a claim on your behalf. In that case, we can provide you with proof of payment that you can submit for direct reimbursement. Please note that with any plan there may be deductible and cost-share amounts for which you could be responsible.

We’re happy to help you with insurance forms or answer any questions you may have concerning our services.

Find out more

  • Amputee Resources for Canadian Amputees
    Amputee and disability resources, including amputee phantom pain support group, humour, stories, news, and more for the active or new amputee.
  • War Amps of Canada
    The organization seeks to improve the quality of life for all amputees, especially children, and is a wealth of information and support.
  • Orthotics Prosthetics Canada/CBCPO
    The association encourages and promotes high standards of professionalism and patient-care services in the prosthetic and orthotic profession. The CBCPO is the regulatory body for the prosthetic and orthotic profession within Canada. As well, the organization provides information on new initiatives, professional issues, and certification news for the prosthetics and orthotics industry and the general public. Locate a certified practitioner in your area using this website.
  • AASRA (Alberta Amputee Sports and Recreation Association)
    The association supports and empowers Alberta amputees through sport and recreation.
  • Amputation Help and Resource Guide
    This website includes very good information about products you may need for your daily living. It is separated into several categories of interest.

What we can offer you

A relationship based on trust

Your prosthetic fittings should be a positive experience — physically, emotionally, and mentally. As a consumer, you can choose your dentist, eye doctor, physician — and your prosthetist.

Over the past 20 years, we have developed long-term, trusting relationships with our clients. We listen to our clients, treat them with respect, and are committed to serving their needs.

You and your prosthetist will likely have a relationship for the rest of your life. We offer compassionate, respectful, and knowledgeable prosthetic care that ensures the best possible outcome for you.

Experience and expertise

With over 30 years’ experience in prosthetics, Stan Wlodarczyk has long been a pioneer in the field. He was the sole prosthetist in the engineering design process and clinical trials for the prototype of the Ottobock C-Leg (the first intelligent microprocessor-controlled knee).

He collaborated also in conceptualizing and trialing the Harmony/VASS vacuum-assisted socket system. In 1999, as an adjunct instructor for TEC Interface Systems, Stan introduced custom liners and VASS technology to Canada.

Stan is a certified prosthetist both in Canada and the United States. He is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthotists & Prosthetists — the first and only Canadian to receive this honour.

Dan MacKinnon is a certified prosthetist in Canada with a strong rehabilitation background. He began his career as an exercise therapist and now finds prosthetics to be a perfect combination of helping amputees to regain function and building devices with his hands.

We have the experience and expertise, working with your physician and therapist, to achieve excellent results for you.

How do I find another prosthetist?

Ask your orthopedic surgeon or a member of your rehabilitation team for a complete list of all of the prosthetists in the Edmonton area. You can also locate a certified prosthetist using one of the following:

As a consumer, you have a choice of dentist, eye doctor, physician — and prosthetist. And as an amputee, you can choose who will make your artificial limbs.

Making the change (paperwork)

The government of Alberta requires that an amputee be seen by only one prosthetist at a time. Most other funding agencies also adhere to this policy. We are happy to help you through the compliance process so that you can work with one of our prosthetists.

Find out more

  • Amputee Resources for Canadian Amputees
    Amputee and disability resources, including amputee phantom pain support group, humour, stories, news, and more for the active or new amputee.
  • War Amps of Canada
    The organization seeks to improve the quality of life for all amputees, especially children, and is a wealth of information and support.
  • Orthotics Prosthetics Canada/CBCPO
    The association encourages and promotes high standards of professionalism and patient-care services in the prosthetic and orthotic profession. The CBCPO is the regulatory body for the prosthetic and orthotic profession within Canada. As well, the organization provides information on new initiatives, professional issues, and certification news for the prosthetics and orthotics industry and the general public. Locate a certified practitioner in your area using this website.
  • AASRA (Alberta Amputee Sports and Recreation Association)
    The association supports and empowers Alberta amputees through sport and recreation.
  • Amputation Help and Resource Guide
    This website includes very good information about products you may need for your daily living. It is separated into several categories of interest.